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A beautiful engraved gold watch, presented, on Oct. Richard Cumming by the workmen & officials of Messrs. The business remained at North Dock for the rest of its life - i.e. Taylor or ii) Captain Burn in command, with a cargo of coal, it was driven ashore in a hurricane on Caribou reef or Island, Anticosti Island (cannot spot exactly where), in the Gulf of St. How extraordinary that detail of what happened in May 1869 is available to us today thanks to a letter sent to New Zealand ('NZ') & published in the 'Nelson Examiner ...', a NZ newspaper, in Sep. to 1922, I have read, but I am not 100% sure of that - see a few paragraphs below re Cydonia. At that time, I am advised, a time before welding became the norm, masts were riveted together. Firstly there is, on site, a 'Blumer' build list from its earliest days in 1859 thru to the very end. And he has assembled a list of 18 vessels constructed at North Sands in the years of 1859 through 1865. 'Where Ships Are Born' indicates that the Avon was 'in some records credited to Pace, Blumer's foreman, but the explanation might be that Pace had a share in the business during those early days'. In view of the business name of 'Pace, Blumer' referred to above. Built, it would seem for Gayner of Sunderland, & owned as to 48/64 by R. Shipbuilding was in the Fraser family's blood - a common Sunderland story perhaps. Michael's data is now included in the 'Blumer' build list now on site. The webmaster has a limited number of 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him (image at left) &, for what would appear to be Avon's entire life, they record 'Pace' as the builder. Luke Blumer's (1) third son was William Blumer (1789/1850) and it is William's son John Blumer (1832/1913) who commenced shipbuilding in Sunderland. From 1876/77, the vessel was registered at Shields. Dixon' became the vessel's owners, also of Shields. A fine image of John Blumer, dating from perhaps 1890/1900, is at left below. The Mercantile Navy List of 1880 states the owner to be R. The vessel is not listed in the 1887/88 edition of Lloyd's Register, which may mean that the vessel had been lost or broken up but it could also mean that there was a change of vessel name.

I am advised that 'Blumers' built a ship named 'John Blumer' in 1914, the year after John Blumer died in retirement. And William Blumer died at Harrogate soon thereafter, leaving an estate of 373,144 - I think that value is correct, the newspaper cutting being quite difficult to read. 10, 1873, the vessel was, I have read, transferred to North Shields. John Blumer retired from the business on December 31, 1895. I have not read the circumstances but do we have a hint. The partnership which existed prior to that date, the partnership of Arthur Robson & John Blumer, styled 'John Blumer and Co.' was then dissolved. The 1883/84 edition of 'Lloyd's' notes the vessel to be 'missing'. Thanks to Sheila Buttinger we now know a little more. (Thomas) Gilhespie was reported dead at sea in 1883 - drowned as a result of the total wreck, on Jan. While en route from Seaham to Devonport with Ralph Davison, of Crofton Mills, Blyth, Northumberland, in command. A notice about John Blumer's death, can be seen here (PERSONAL, 85% down), & also here. The company failed during the shipbuilding slump that followed WW1, after completing Ixia in Jul. It would seem to have built 258 vessels in its lifetime at North Dock, the last such vessel, Cydonia, a cargo ship of 3517 tons, being on the stocks for 4 years, & finally launched on Dec. Ray Ranns has kindly provided a newspaper cutting which advises that on Feb. John Blumer & Company Limited, be voluntarily wound up & its assets distributed. You are invited to visit this page for some general data about 'Blumer'. And next a splendid image, taken at Blumers in the early 1900s, shown here thanks to the kindness of Malcolm Fraser of Durham City.